Monday, June 27, 2016

Long Island National Cemetery


I went to a funeral today, of someone I knew from work.  He was a partner of a colleague who is my friend.  The newspaper is on the other side of the highway from this cemetery and I always knew this cemetery as "Pinelawn Cemetery."  So I drove here for the graveside service, only to discover I was at the wrong cemetery!  This is the veteran's cemetery, known as "Long Island National Cemetery."  Duh!  So then I went to the correct place.  But after the service, I came back here, because I had seen scenes like this!  Long Island National Cemetery consists of 365 acres, and was established in 1936.  As of 2014 there were about 346,000 interments.  It is an astounding sight to see, with gravestones that go out of sight into the distance.

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

Whoever designed this cemetery must have had a loving heart. It is artistic and simple with its undulating curves from the headstones. An almost calming effect. And very sad...bsk

Anonymous said...

I am sorry for your loss. This cemetery is incredible. Ditto to Betsey's comment. I never thought of a cemetary being so large, except in Washington, DC
Joan

Anonymous said...

This brings tears. So many who have kept this country safe, now gone. We may not do everything right in this country, but the national cemeteries are one thing we can be proud of. The two here on Long Island, in Pinelawn and Calverton, are kept immaculate - an honor to the memory of all those who served. If there are 346,000 buried in Pinelawn, there are that many stories to tell. Thanks to every one of these men and women.

Ken Spencer said...

Thank you all for your comments. I love this photograph because it shows how many have died. Interesting to note, many of these tombstones are for veterans who returned home and then died here of old age. I saw a number of tombstones with deaths in the 80's and the 90's.

Anonymous said...

That's one huge benefit of having served in the military. You get a free burial space at a national cemetery if you want one, and your spouse can also be buried there. In cases where a child dies before a parent, the child is buried there for free, also. Families who have their loved ones buried in National Cemeteries don't have to worry about maintenance. Taxpayers pick up the tab, and it's one I'm happy to support.